3D TV

When I knew I was moving from Ohio to Nebraska, I knew I wanted to get rid of my big 54" box tv (bought in 2004) and upgrade to whatever everyone else has!  A nice flat screen tv.  And of course, when buying stuff, I have to get one of the best.  I also would have loved to get the biggest one too but the area above the fireplace could only fit maybe a 55" so I settled on a 50" Samsung 3D HDTV Smart TV.  I actually never wanted the 3D but Best Buy had none of the one without 3D in their warehouses anywhere.  I wanted to buy it from Best Buy because I had a credit card and I would get 3 years same as cash.  Yes, please!

So I ended up getting the 3D tv which was $100 more.  I actually, in the end, got that $100 back because of the drama (long story) when I tried to buy the non-3D tv.  So I basically got 3D for free!

So then I got all excited about it!  I had a blu-ray player but it wasn't 3D so I had to go out and buy another blu-ray player.  Also, got the movie Titanic to be the first movie I watch in 3D.  Just hooked it up today and started watching it.

It was SO crazy when I first popped in the blu-ray.  The menu screen basically popped out into my living room - it was so insane!  Like freaky almost.  Disclaimer here - I've NEVER seen 3D in the movie theaters or anywhere else for that matter.  So this was a brand new experience for me.  I was excited.

So I'm watching the movie.  It doesn't jump out a lot like the menu screen does but it was pretty cool what it did do.  I kept thinking "I wonder what Avatar would look like."  I bet its amazing.

Well an hour into the movie, I started getting a massive headache.  Noooo!!!  So I had to stop the movie, take some pills, and lay down.  An hour and a half later, I still got a slight headache.  I don't know if I can finish that movie!  I don't know if I'll be watching 3D movies in the future but I really really want to still see Avatar in 3D.  So we'll see.

Have any of you ever had issues with watching 3D?

CNET says this:

Viewing certain programs on a 3D TV can cause headaches or other ill effects in some viewers, especially over longer periods of time. In our experience, and in the opinions of most experts we've consulted, the main cause of headaches or eye fatigue isn't the 3D technology itself; it's badly produced 3D content.

Comfort is a major concern of most 3D producers. Too much of a 3D effect can become tiresome after a while, abrupt camera movement can be disorienting, and certain onscreen objects can appear blurry, for example. The best 3D movies, like Avatar, tend to use depth effects that stay close to the plane of the screen, with fewer gotcha objects that pop out or recede into the screen excessively. Even so, comfort with 3D varies widely from viewer to viewer, and one recent study found that older viewers can experience less discomfort than younger ones.

Here are some pictures of my tv if you want to check them out:



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